A Scientific Approach

So I work in the Learning Zone at Central Saint Martins, which accommodates a staggeringly disproportionate amount of student printing, especially so towards deadlines.

Frustrations run high as the pressure mounts. When a student has spend the last 4 or 5 hours staring at a monitor often making minute changes to their work, and then when the send it to print and it doesn’t reproduce on paper how it showed up on screen nor how they were expecting, they can be understandingly devastated.

Beyond the basic logistical issues people come up against – which printer to send to, accidentally setting double sided or mono when it should have been colour, there is a lack of appreciation into the work that must go in to a successful print.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABut there is a fault shared by the majority in their approach to printing. One should not simply think of all the work as done in the software, and then printing simply as a case of hitting the button and being done – a thoughtful, considered and approach that can adapt will necessarily produce a better print, that looks closer to how you wanted it to look.

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You must learn about colour, and ink, and colour spaces.

 

 

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Thinking Design

Games have a fantastic potential to help you explore the consequences of design, which is another way of saying, finding the most effective design by trial, and mostly, error.

Case in Point: ‘Dream Car Racing’

http://dreamcarracing.com/dcr3-play.html

This game allows you to build a vehicle in the garage, with options for various shock absorbers, chains, tyres, frames etc. and then to race it on a varied terrain.

Each decision you make affects the way the car performs. I’ve found the best way with this is to get rid of the template, start from stratch, and slowly (through mistakes) realise why the template is the way it is.

That’s probably a good method for a lot of processes.

*edit. A good example is the shock absorbers. I knew why the wheels were attached to shock absorbers in theory, but it wasn’t until I attached a wheel in the middle of the vehicle directly on to the frame, and start bouncing every time I landed on it, that I really understood exactly why