Okay Google, what is a troll?

burgerking

Burger King released an ad in the US with a clever ploy.

The BK employee acknowledges the time constraints he is under before revealing that he has ‘an idea’.

“Okay Google,” he begins, the phrase which triggers any compatible devices to read aloud the definition gathered from the website at the top of the corresponding Google search “what is the Whopper Burger?”

Initially, the gambit was successful, as presumably the company knew, the phrase successfully activated the feature on compatible products in homes across America. Slight problem – trolls.

Those looking for kicks, presumably the good folks over at /b/, edited the Wikipedia article in order to get the new, fecicious definition to be read out instead – that the whopper was made of “child” and contained cyanide.

Their fun was cut short when Google, who were not consulted about the ad, made sure that the phrase no longer activated the feature.

At work, an Italian staff member asked to lend a pair of headphones. She then questioned herself, asking whether it should be lend or borrow.

I told her it should be borrow, but a lot of people use lend to mean borrow.

She then said that the reason she got confused is because in Italian, lend and borrow are the same word; ‘presta’.

It reminded me of a story of a hacker who typed with clearly “broken” English. In order to try and identify the identity of the hacker, a linguist was tasked with determining the mother tongue of the speaker, based on the specific grammatical mistakes he was making – on the basis that mistakes made in a second language are not random, rather (usually) a misapplication of the same grammatical rules of the speaker’s mother tongue.
Here’s the super interesting part: the hacker was using fake broken English – that is to say, he was a native English speaker, deliberately making mistakes in order to try and throw investigators off the scent – the mistakes were too random, not based in any specific grammatical structure.